Preventive Dentistry

Dental Hygiene

Dental hygiene is the cornerstone of good oral health and we actively encourage our patients to make use of our dental hygienists. Seeing a dental hygienist on a regular basis will not only reduce your risk of developing tooth decay and gum disease, it will also ensure that your teeth look radiant and clean.

The hygienist’s main role is to professionally clean the teeth for the patient. This is usually called scaling and polishing. They also give advice on diet and preventing dental decay. The hygienist will work with your dentist to provide care tailored to your needs.

We firmly believe that prevention is always better than cure, and regular hygiene visits are an essential part of this preventative approach.

Hygienist Appointment

Each appointment lasts 30 minutes and is specifically tailored to your oral health needs involving:

  • Discussion about your symptoms
  • A basic periodontal examination
  • Scale and polish of your teeth
  • Advice about teeth cleaning and choosing oral hygiene products
  • Advice about diet and nutrition
  • Advice on giving up smoking when applicable

Air Abrasion

Air abrasion is a drill free technique which can be performed by your hygienist. It works through a combination of air, sodium bi-carbonate and a jet of water to remove staining caused through everyday wear and tear such as tea, coffee, red wine and smoking. It produces great results without any risks of damaging your teeth, it will significantly improve tooth staining, leaving your mouth clean and fresh after treatment.

Costs

Hygienist appointment - £45
Air Abrasion treatment - £40
Hyginist appointment with air abrasion - £70

Gum Disease

Good Oral Hygiene is not limited to your teeth only. It includes the whole mouth, the gums and supporting tissues, and the tongue.

Gum disease is the biggest cause of tooth loss in adults today. There are various stages of gum disease with the two most common forms being gingivitis and adult periodontitis. It's estimated that 1 in 4 people are affected by advanced gum disease, with about 75 percent of adults experiencing some type of gum problem.

A combination of bacteria and acids in the mouth form a sticky deposit called dental plaque that clings to the teeth. Plaque that is not removed from the teeth hardens into calculus and tartar, which aggravates the gums. Pockets (filled with plaque) form between the teeth and gums - causing the irritated gums to detach or pull away from the teeth. At this point, the infection has advanced below the gum line and it can destroy the soft tissue, bone and ligaments that support the teeth. The teeth may become abscessed and loose, and even fall out.

Symptoms of Periodontal Infection

Usually Periodontal Infection is painless until it reaches more advanced stages. However there are some symptoms which can indicate the presence of Periodontal Infection.

These include:

  • Red or swollen gums
  • Bleeding when brushing (pink toothbrush) or at other times
  • Aching, itchy, sore or tender gums
  • Receding gums (teeth beginning to look longer)
  • Bad breath
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Loose, separating or protruding teeth
  • Spaces between teeth

Gum Disease FAQs

A. Gum disease describes swelling, soreness or infection of the tissues supporting the teeth. There are two main forms of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontal disease.
A. Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums. This is when the gums around the teeth become very red and swollen. Often the swollen gums bleed when they are brushed during cleaning.
A. Long-standing gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease. There are a number of types of periodontal disease and they all affect the tissues supporting the teeth. As the disease gets worse the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw is lost, making the teeth loose. If this is not treated, the teeth may eventually fall out. In fact, more teeth are lost through periodontal disease than through tooth decay.
A. Probably. Most people suffer from some form of gum disease, and it is the major cause of tooth loss in adults. However, the disease develops very slowly in most people, and it can be slowed down to a rate that should allow you to keep most of your teeth for life.
A. Probably. Most people suffer from some form of gum disease, and it is the major cause of tooth loss in adults. However, the disease develops very slowly in most people, and it can be slowed down to a rate that should allow you to keep most of your teeth for life.
A. A. Smoking can also make gum disease worse. Patients who smoke are more likely to produce bacterial plaque, which leads to gum disease. The gums are affected because smoking causes a lack of oxygen in the bloodstream, so the infected gums fail to heal. Smoking causes people to have more dental plaque and for gum disease to progress more rapidly than in non-smokers. Gum disease still remains the most common cause of tooth loss in adults.
A. Unfortunately, gum disease progresses painlessly on the whole so that you do notice the damage it is doing. However, the bacteria are sometimes more active and this makes your gums sore. This can lead to gum abscesses, and pus may ooze from around the teeth. Over a number of years, the bone supporting the teeth can be lost. If the disease is left untreated for a long time, treatment can become more difficult.
A. The first sign is blood on the toothbrush or in the rinsing water when you clean your teeth. Your gums may also bleed when you are eating, leaving a bad taste in your mouth. Your breath may also become unpleasant.
A. Veneers should last for many years; but they can chip or break, just as your own teeth can. Your dentist will tell you how long each individual veneer should last. Small chips can be repaired, or a new veneer fitted if necessary.
A. Your dentist will clean your teeth thoroughly to remove the scale. You'll also be shown how to remove plaque successfully yourself, cleaning all surfaces of your teeth thoroughly and effectively. This may take a number of sessions with the dentist or hygienist.
A. Once your teeth are clean, your dentist may decide to carry out further cleaning of the roots of the teeth, to make sure that the last pockets of bacteria are removed. This is known as root planing. You?ll probably need the treatment area to be numbered before anything is done. Afterwards, you may feel some discomfort for up to 48 hours.
A. A. The periodontal diseases are never cured. But it can be controlled, as long as you keep up the home care you have been taught. Any further loss of bone will be very slow and it may stop altogether. However, you must make sure you remove plaque every day, and go for regular check ups by the dentist and hygienist.

Fissure Sealants

Deep pits and grooves can be found on the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. Such pits and grooves are termed 'fissures' and are usually so narrow that toothbrush bristles and streams of water are not able to clean them effectively. These form a favourable environment for bacteria to flourish, often resulting in tooth decay.

Fissure sealants can be applied to the teeth. Fissure sealants are special materials used by dentists to seal off pits and fissures from the oral environment. Sealing the tooth surface protects fissures from bacteria and fermentable foods like sugar and starches to prevent decay from starting deep within the fissures. Any tooth with pits and fissures can be treated, provided the surface to be filled is sound and has not been previously filled. The most commonly treated teeth are the molars and premolars.

Mouth Cancer Screening

Mouth cancer is a malignant growth which can occur in any part of the mouth, including the tongue, lips and throat. Mouth cancers have a higher proportion of deaths per number of cases than breast cancer, cervical cancer or skin melanoma. The mortality rate is just over 50%, despite treatment, with about 1,700 deaths per year in the UK. This is because of late detection. Visit your dentist at once if you notice any abnormal problems or are not sure. Regular dental checkups allow early detection of abnormalities in the mouth.

Mouth Cancer Foundation

The Mouth Cancer Foundation is a registered charity that raises awareness of mouth cancers and proviedes information and support to patients, carers and health professionals.

Mouth Cancer Foundation